Posts Tagged ‘morality’

The Cycle of Life

My inspiration for writing this article is something that I feel strongly about, yet will never be able to physically change. But hopefully, by the end of the piece, I’d like ┬áto have made some people aware of their actions and possibly change your perspective on certain aspects of the life around us.

The cycle of life is, quite simply, amazing. The complexity of our eco-system is truly breath-taking. Each and every animal or plant you see devours something else in order to sustain life and, considering there are an estimated 10 million different species on earth, the cycle of life is immense.

Think about the number of animals and plants we consume during our lifespan as humans. Say an average person lives for seventy years, the amount of life we consume to stay alive ourselves is phenomenal. This is just one cycle of life, the world as a whole has hundreds of thousands.

Death is integral to life. Without death, life wouldn’t (feasibly) be possible. Though I couldn’t be the one to shoot a cow or catch a fish, I accept that killing animals is part of the lives we have to live.

Vegetarians may well have a different view upon this: a natural argument being that we could physically survive eating only plants. This is a very interesting topic on morality in my view.

Where does plant-life come into it? Surely plant-life should have as many rights as an animal. Plants use the exact same cycles as any animal, though obviously the ingredients to sustain life are different. So shouldn’t the same respect be given to plants as is shown to animals, or does life have to have a brain to become worthy of consideration?

That is simply a thought for your own morality. I really don’t think there will be convictions for a person picking a daffodil in the future

What I find quite distressing is that size really does matter in terms of respect given to animals. It’s confusing to understand why. A person picks a flower in a forest, no-one minds. A person cuts down a tree in a forest, they are condemned. Animals are similarly afforded respect out of their simple uses to humans as well as their size. Why does a dog carry a higher right to life than an ant?

All too often I see people killing animals out of mere annoyance, savagery or even pleasure. Killing a fly for buzzing too loudly, a spider for being a spider, an ant because it’s small. You wouldn’t kill a dog for eating the last sausage roll you dropped. What possible right does anyone have to wipe out a life through annoyance. I truly abhor this notion.

Gamekeeper’s rearing pheasants, nurturing them through childhood, then letting them loose to hunt them down with guns. Fox-hunting and deer-hunting for social and sporting pleasure. Bullfighting for public entertainment. The list goes on and on for the unnecessary killing of animals.

That’s a list of things I’ll never be able to change, and no doubt the government will never effectively ban either.

But I implore you, the next time you see a fly buzzing around that annoys you, or an ant that strays into your path, think twice about needlessly destroying life which is so precious.

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The Meaning of Life

I haven’t written for a few days now and this article is why – naturally a lot to think about. I appreciate that this, like any of my other articles, is completely subjective but here are my insights – I hope you enjoy.

Now here’s an interesting topic to write about. Not many, such as the brilliant Monty Python crew, can pull it off successfully, but here goes. The meaning of life is a subject that just about every human will think about at some point in their lives. What is the purpose of us being here? Are we simply a complex mixture of chemicals, reacting to the probabilities of our genetic code? Or maybe we are something more.

Now there are several common paths which are widely accredited as possible truths. The most commonly known is procreation; the simple purpose of being born to produce offspring and carry on the cycle of life.

Now, personally, this isn’t a path I find credible. If we are simply created to create others, what of those males that are born, who would have much preferred to suckle on their fathers teat? Homosexuality as a whole could cover around 5% of the world’s population. Of course, it could be a lot more or less, but with certain societies incredibly closed-minded to such practices, it’s hard to know the actual number. (I won’t go into such bigotry here as I could, and will, do a whole article on the stupidity of certain racists.) Now that would be a rather crass mistake if procreation was our sole purpose. No doubt procreation is essential for life, but is it a sole meaning to our lives? I don’t think so, that would render possibly 30 million lives without purpose.

Religion is the next obvious path. The number of religions in this world are infinite. As the interpretation of everyone’s brain to either the teachings they follow or the philosophies they themselves believe, essentially every single person alive follows their own unique path – or ‘religion’. That’s what brings so much conflict to the inner parts of every religious organisation, which is why I find myself despising large amounts of religion. If everyone could accept the subjectivity of reading texts and interpretation, there would be a lot less conflict in the arrogance of individuals trying to convince everyone that only one word is truth – often by means of violence and threats. As an example, look at the leader of the Catholic church – the pope. Last year he claimed that condoms would help the spread of HIV and AIDs in Africa. I don’t think I need to highlight my view on that, as I assume everybody reading this has been to primary school and could make a more intelligent assessment.

That said, religion does bring such meaning to so many lives that, in fact, a lot of followers dedicate their whole life to the teachings of a few. What I find quite incredulous to my mind is that I see religion quite like a hereditary disease. Depending on whereabouts in the world you are brought up, and the parents you have bringing you into the world, you seem to be assigned a religion. I find that quite hard to get my head around this. I find it’s almost like tribal traditions. Some tribes slaughtered lambs in sacrifice, some slaughtered pigs. Depending on which tribe you were brought up in, that was the ‘word’ you believed. I could never personally base my life’s purpose on this concept. Especially as tribes kill each other because they chose the lamb, not the pig.

Next up – life. The meaning of life is life? Sounds a little surreal when put like that, yet isn’t it the path which makes the most sense? With each breath we take in, we move one step closer to the grim reaper. That’s quite a contradictory thought, potentially both morbid and inspirational. It can be taken either way: sit down and be depressed by the thought that death awaits or make the most of the time the reaper allows. This is a path many, many individuals follow. Live fa(s)t, die young: take in the full force of life, live it to its potential and disregard the consequences. This path can go in many directions depending on the nature of the individual. It could be drinking themselves stupid every night, taking every drug under the Sun. It could be trying that aforementioned procreation – except without the creation.

Sounds fun, does it not? Well, probably not to a Shoalin monk. Although this path no doubt fulfils some of the wildest dreams in a life with no regret, it can often lead to a person being spiritually and mentally unfulfilled. Look at the plights of many former rock stars: a life of unlimited money, sex and drugs often leads to deep depression. So, personally, this isn’t a credible path for me either.

Now the last meaning I’ll bring up: is that there’s no meaning at all. Some people may come to the conclusion that we are simply an anomaly. The whole universe is simply just a chemical reaction and we are a minuscule part of the result. There is no God, there is no meaning to our lives, we simply are born and then we die – nothing we do has the remotest effect on anything.

To counter this kind of argument, I find quite impossible – not because I believe it, but because it’s hard to prove that this isn’t true. For thousands of years philosophers and scientists have asked these questions, and none can give you a definitive answer. Perhaps, in years to come, they may discover the mathematical purpose of our being here, but I can’t see that happening. Life has an aura of mystery, one I’d love to discover, yet I along with many others doubt that I’ll ever find it.

So what is the meaning to life? I could answer you, but to be honest that’s personal.

Yet if you asked me what the meaning was to your life, well, that’s simple. It’s whatever YOU want it to be.